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Common Costs of Home Repairs You Should Expect

July 23, 2021

Whether you’re a first-time homeowner or have been living in the same home for years, you can expect home repairs to come up. From a small problem you can fix yourself to a major issue that requires expert assistance, the time and money spent on home repairs can be frustrating. Knowing what to expect to pay can help you prep your finances and save you a whole lot of stress.

Home Repairs and Their Average Cost

Average home repair costs vary depending on the severity of the issue, where you live, who you hire, and the current cost of supplies. Knowing the national averages can give you an idea of how much you might need to spend on repair projects.

Type of Home Repair Warning Signs Average Cost*
Roof repairs You see a ceiling stain, leak, or missing shingles. $400 for minor repairs and $1,000 for larger repairs. Removing and replacing a roof can cost upwards of $10,000.
Foundation repairs You notice cracks on exterior walls, sheetrock, or uneven floors. $4,500 for common issues, but around $500 to $600 to fix minor cracks.
Siding repairs There’s rot, cracks, or mold in the siding. $500 to $700 for common repairs, but it depends on the material.
Mold remediation There’s mold growing in your home, or you notice new allergies. $10 to $30 per square foot. That’s $1,000 to $3,000 for a 10-by-10 room.
Termite treatment You find termite droppings or wings, damaged wood, or underground tubes. $500 to $600 for a treatment, or around $2,500 to tent the entire house.
Water system repairs The water softener, filter, or purifier stops working. $150 to $800, depending on the system and repairs.
Water heater repairs The water heater stops working efficiently. $500 to $600 for repairs, and up to $1,600 for a replacement.
HVAC repairs The air conditioning or furnace aren’t working efficiently. $150 to $450 for repairs. Or, $3,000 to $6,000 for a replacement.
Septic system repairs The toilets and drains aren’t working well, or you notice unpleasant smells. $1,750 to $2,000 to fix common issues.

*We’ve based the average costs on estimates from HomeAdvisor, HomeGuide, and service providers’ websites.

Common repair and home maintenance costs

A little prevention and maintenance can help you avoid costly real-estate projects, but some common home repairs can catch you by surprise when either moving into a new home or after a few years living in the same house.

Garbage disposal repairs

A leaking, clogged, or odd-sounding garbage disposal could be a sign that it’s time to call a plumber or buy a new unit. A repair can cost around $100 to $250, depending on the job. Buying a new garbage disposal and paying a professional to install it can cost around $350 to $500.

Bathroom repairs

It can cost less than $100 to clear a clogged drain or several hundred to replace a standard sink or toilet. Larger projects, like refinishing a bathtub, can cost around $500.

Leaky drains

On average, plumbers charge around $50 to $200 per hour to inspect your home and fix leaky drains. Depending on the location of the leak, it may take several hours to find and repair. But some plumbers offer a flat-rate fee for basic services, like repairing leaky faucets.

Electrical work

Electricians charge around $40 to $120 an hour depending on their experience, and some charge an initial call fee. A new outlet or switch could cost around $150 to $200, while replacing a breaker can cost anywhere from $100 to $150.

Grout cleaning and sealing

You should have your grout cleaned and resealed every few years, which costs about 25 to 50 cents per square foot. Removing and replacing old grout can cost about ten times as much.

Cleaning out gutters

You may need to clean your gutters several times per year. The cost can range from $1 to $2 per linear foot, with higher fees for two- or three-story buildings. On average, gutter cleaning for a single-story home costs around $75 to $200.

Repairing a deck

Deck repair costs depend on the material and where you live, with basic repairs costing around $500. But most larger deck projects cost around $1,500 to $2,500.

Tree removal

It can cost around $600 to $700 to get a tree removed from your property, although it depends on the size and how easy the tree is to access. You may also have to pay additional fees for stump and debris removal.

Interior painting

Painting the interior of your home can cost around $1 to $6 per square foot, depending on the paint you choose and the height of your walls. A 12-by-12 room can cost anywhere from $400 to $900.

Exterior paint jobs

It could cost about $3,000 to $6,000 to paint the exterior of a two-story, 2,500 square foot home. Naturally, average costs decrease for smaller homes and increase for larger homes.

Factors That Impact Home Repair Costs

Average costs for home repairs are a good starting point, but there are other factors to consider when determining how much your home repair project might cost.

Your location

Where you live can impact labor costs and the types of repairs to account for in your home maintenance budget. After all, you don’t need to worry about replacing a septic system if you don’t have one.

Availability of supplies

Shortages can drive up the cost of the basic building materials you may need for home repair projects. If delaying the repair won’t create a larger problem later, it may make sense to wait until prices come back down.

Who you hire

If you have time, get quotes from several professionals to compare services and price estimates. And ask around in your community for referrals and recommendations before making a decision. Remember, the lowest price isn’t necessarily best if the work is subpar.

If you’re handy, a DIY approach can save you money on some home repair projects. But larger repairs, like electrical or plumbing work, may be better left to professionals.

Home age and condition

Older homes may require more maintenance and repairs than newer homes. Research the average lifespan of your appliances, fixtures, roof, and other parts of your home to help estimate potential repair costs.

Benefits of Paying for Home Repair Costs with a Personal Loan

You may need to borrow money when an unexpected repair catches you off guard. While credit cards can be convenient, they often charge high interest rates or cash advance fees, and it can be difficult to pay the bill quickly. Rather than raking up credit card debt, an unsecured home improvement personal loan could help get you the cash you need at low costs. Here are four reasons to consider a personal loan:

1. You can check your rate without hurting your credit.

You can check your potential loan terms online with a soft credit pull—which doesn’t impact your credit scores. It only takes a couple of minutes, and you can compare loan offers to see which one works best for you without filling out an official application.

2. You can have access to your money quickly.

Though it varies from lender to lender, at LendingClub Bank, you can be approved for a home improvement loan in 24 hours and the funds could be in your bank account within two days.1,2

3. You don’t need to offer collateral or equity.

Unsecured personal loans are based on your creditworthiness, not your home’s value or how much equity you have in the home. And, unlike with some home equity loans and lines of credit, you don’t need to wait or pay for a home appraisal.

4. You don’t have to worry about prepayment penalties.

LendingClub Bank’s home improvement loans don’t have any prepayment penalties, which means you can pay off the loan early without getting charged extra. This can help you save money by reducing how much interest you pay overall.

 

Home Repair Costs FAQs

How much does it cost to repair a home?

Home repair costs can depend on a variety of factors, such as the type of repair, where you live, and who you hire. A minor repair might cost less than $500, while most major repairs cost several thousand dollars.

What are the most expensive repairs on a home?

In most cases, repairing your home’s foundation or roof replacement are the most expensive home repairs. Mold removal, fixing water damage, and replacing major appliances or fixtures (like air conditioning units and septic systems) can also be particularly pricey.

Which type of financing is best for home repairs?

In most cases, the type of home repair can impact which type of financing is best. A credit card, for example, might make sense for minor repairs, while a personal loan could be a better fit for repairs that cost over $1,000. if you’re investing in a major home improvement, a home equity loan could offer low rates and tax benefits.

No matter which type of financing you’re considering, compare rates and offers from several lenders to find the best option.

Should you use your savings to pay for home repairs?

If you can afford it, using your savings could be the best way to pay for home repairs. But make sure to not deplete your emergency fund. If you don’t have the cash, a personal loan can help you gain access to the funds you need.

How much should you set aside for home repairs?

You should consider the age, condition, size, and location of your home when budgeting for home repair projects. But generally speaking, the 1% rule of thumb is a good place to start. That means you’d set aside 1% of your home’s value each year for home repairs.

 

1 Of all personal loans approved between 10/1/20 – 12/31/20, 69% were approved within 24 hours

Between April 2021 and June 2021, personal loans were funded within 48 hours after loan approval, on average. The time it takes for a loan to be funded is not guaranteed and individual results vary based on multiple factors, including but not limited to investor demand.

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